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Wired
09-13-2011, 11:29 PM
Prime Minister David Cameron has made himself clear on how much he supports marriage but how important is marriage and what is marriage anyway? Does a marriage have to be recognised by the state for it to make an impact? If you are religious, does a marriage have to be performed with the states consent in order to make it legitimate in the eyes of God? What, if any, ceremony or has to be performed in order to make a marriage 'real'?

I dont know exactly what legal privelages marriage gives you (when performed legally) but I dont think that it would bother me if my marriage was recognised by the government or not. What do you think?

eatmywords
09-14-2011, 05:37 AM
Just as much as a dog needs a licence, so do the sheep of an Imperialist State need a definition of what is deemed acceptable between a man and a woman. No matter what is said in a marriage ceremony, the licence still defines what is owned, and who owns it. If you didn't have a licence doxology a person could end up marrying a street-lamp. And tell me, what the hell is wrong with that?!

Danny M
09-14-2011, 10:20 PM
For me personally, I've always hated the thought of being married because it seems to be a society constructed concept really from top to bottom. People act like it's some kind of natural thing and it just doesn't sit with me. So yes, while I do see myself being the father figure in a nuclear family in 20 or so years time I don't think the woman I'm living and raising children with will be my wife.


As for how important it is, well I can see both advantages to the traditional family, but I fail to see exactly why it matters whether or not the parents are married. I also see an advantage to other less traditional systems, most notably where the child(ren) have their two parents living separately, both in homes with two breadwinners. That way you get all the advantages of the nuclear family doubled, also if there's ever a sudden breakdown in the relationship with the people you're living with you immediately have somewhere to go.

Will
09-15-2011, 01:33 AM
For me personally, I've always hated the thought of being married because it seems to be a society constructed concept really from top to bottom. People act like it's some kind of natural thing and it just doesn't sit with me. So yes, while I do see myself being the father figure in a nuclear family in 20 or so years time I don't think the woman I'm living and raising children with will be my wife.


As for how important it is, well I can see both advantages to the traditional family, but I fail to see exactly why it matters whether or not the parents are married. I also see an advantage to other less traditional systems, most notably where the child(ren) have their two parents living separately, both in homes with two breadwinners. That way you get all the advantages of the nuclear family doubled, also if there's ever a sudden breakdown in the relationship with the people you're living with you immediately have somewhere to go.

I'm not sure I agree. But I have to admit I'm going purely on instinct here - which is actually my point. You only have to look in nature to see how raising offspring is often enough a joint exercise between male and female. I could hazard a guess at the benefits evolution-wise, as both sexes helping to look after their offspring, increase the likelihood of said offspring surviving. How that translates into the modern family, I couldn't tell you. But getting back to my original point, I'd say it is most definitely natural. Whether it is still of benefit in society today remains to be seen. But if I were a betting man, I'd be willing to say that two parents will raise a more socially balanced child than a single parent. Of course the definition of socially balanced is also subjective, but to simplify it, it's entirely possible it's just our natural instinct, and therefore totally natural.

To get back to the topic in hand, if marriage didn't exist, it may have been necessary to invent it. In other words, it's possible there are evolutionary benefits to long term family unions.