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Thread: French Football In Racism Row

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    Super Moderator eatmywords's Avatar
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    Default French Football In Racism Row

    The French Football Federation is embroiled in a race-row as it has emerged the National team's directors approved a quota to limit the number of black players entering the national squad. Even the coach, Laurent Blanc, has been quoted as saying players should be selected who respect "our culture, our history." Little has been stated on the fact that 70% of the French team that won both the World Cup and the European Cup were of non-French origin, but that seems of little relevance to the French Club authorities, who look to Spain as their inspiration: "We don't have a problem, we have no blacks."

    Is this another instance of a hard-line France repressing civil liberties?
    Last edited by eatmywords; 04-30-2011 at 09:11 AM.
    Faced with certain disaster, defiance is the only answer.

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    Racism and the limit on black players is clearly wrong. However the French are 100% correct to say that all players should respect French culture and history. If you look at the UK we tolerate every culture imaginable but there is no demand on people to respect what was the traditional UK culture,or our history. For that reason so many of the terrorists have lived in the UK.

    Tolerance only works if there is mutual respect for all to believe what they want to believe -not just some to fit a trendy PC agenda.

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    Senior Member Stephen H's Avatar
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    I suppose I had better start by saying that I am no football supporter, I hate the effing game.

    With that in mind, I am highly bemused by the ardent supporters whom you see crying when their team loses or screaming with joy if they win. The bemusement stems from the fact that in any UK football club the majority of the teams are made up of foreigners. All appearing in the teams strip as they sign fr the club and all proclaiming their love and foreign devotion for the club and it's supporters, only to appear in another clubs strip the following season because they offered more money.

    So just what are these football supporters supporting? There is nothing local about the teams other than the town where their stadiuM is located, the players are foreign, the majority of the owners are foreign and many of the managers are foreign, even our national team has a manager who could not speak a word of English when he arrived. (By the way, what exactly does a manager do that demands such a high salary ?)

    Perhaps the football strips are made locally? is that what they are supporting?, nope, they are probably made in china in some sweat shop, I know, it must be the turf! now surely that is British?

    As for the French, they've always been a strange race (too much cheese and garlic), but hey! it's their country and if, unlike us, they have the balls to stand up and proclaim that foreigners are not entitled to do this or do that, then fair play to them, at least they are not letting foreigners walk all over them (like one green and pleasant land I could mention).

    Perhaps we Brits could take a few lessons from them on how to look after your own people first

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    Absolutely.

    Regarding football-in some cases I think it is a lot about a sense of belonging and community and being part of something.

    If you look at the underground rave movement form around 87/88 onwards particularly in Manchester again that was a sense of community -before many had just got drunk and punched each others lights out sadly often on the football terraces.

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    Super Moderator eatmywords's Avatar
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    lol. I like that logic Ishould, and a backhanded compliment to the drug culture.

    In a way I do accept people who represent their country should respect their country, in whatever principles they deem acceptable. But for former Empire States such as France and England, things become rather complicated for immigrants, when they are aware the history of their adopted country is littered with examples of oppression towards their respective countries.

    I always imagine how the Polish felt before WWII and after. When the principled British waded into the conflict to protect Polish sovereignty, and then ended up seeing their country fall into the hands of the communists.

    I want to add, I did a module at university that included India, and right at the front was a turbaned guy. The module was a hypothetical, which considered the retention of India in the Empire, and the more hypotheses the professor stuttered out, the more uncomfortable the turbaned chap became, as there was a mass of head-shaking and groaning from the poor guy. I can't really imagine what contradictions you must feel living in a country, but perhaps Will can enlighten us a bit. But I remember listening to Howard Stern soon after Princess Diana died. He was composing a song in memory of Diana. Although I'm no Royalist, I did find it somewhat repugnant. However, his logic was, if Elton John could do it, then why not anybody else?
    Last edited by eatmywords; 04-30-2011 at 01:49 PM. Reason: added last paragraph.
    Faced with certain disaster, defiance is the only answer.

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    was not about the drugs comrade.

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    Super Moderator eatmywords's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ishouldberunningthecountr View Post
    was not about the drugs comrade.
    They certainly helped though
    Faced with certain disaster, defiance is the only answer.

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    If the French are doing things as quoted then they are being clearly racist, I say if, because these things are sometimes poorly reported. On the other hand the French do tend to think with their hearts and not their brains, and recent performances from the French, team have lacked many things ,but top of the list is passion. If they are suggesting that their black players lack passion, then they are clearly stupid, any player can lack passion , or ability, and you won,t prove it until they play. So to have a quota, for any reason is clearly wrong. If your good enough you should play, as long as your commitment to the cause is high enough, regardless of ethnic background. The French, could making a big mistake here.

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    Super Moderator eatmywords's Avatar
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    I know this isn't French, or in France, but I think it is very applicable to the nature of this post. Two Italian newspapers have caused controversy this week following Italy's win over Germany in the European Championship. La Gazetta della Sport apologised after a cartoon depicted the scorer of the two goals, Mario Balotelli, as King Kong. In some ways I suppose it was to be seen as a compliment, but still widely misses the mark of respect in so many ways. What would be the white equivalent? But the real race card was pulled after the Turin daily Tuttosport ran the headline "Li Abbiamo Fatti Neri", literally translated, "We have made them black", and a full colour image imposed of Balotelli semi-naked with a menacing look about him.

    The paper has defended their banner, saying it was a colloquial saying, as it "was a reference to him being black, but it is just a pun... It was also because when he took his shirt off he looked like a boxer who bruises opponents." I suppose you can duck under the cover of language, but sometimes that language can trip you up. If it is really the case that "no one in Italy will have seen this as racist", then what does that say about the minds of the Italians? The paper has clearly used Balotelli's colour to influence their headline, but if any white player would have been the star of the show, then their colour would not have made the headline; although if it had, it would probably be just as bad, but for very different reasons: "we made them white".

    I suppose it does open up the issue of race and colour of a person, because can a person's race or colour be promoted, or highlighted, as the cause of a team's success? Sounds ridiculous doesn't it, and there seems to be no other avenue than racist tendencies that drove the headline to the cover of the paper, whether intentionally or not: "Drawing attention to the colour of Balotelli's skin dehumanises him and labels him as a black player before all else, even when he is proudly playing for Italy."

    Do you think it racist?

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/football/2...balotelli-slur
    Last edited by eatmywords; 06-30-2012 at 04:49 AM.
    Faced with certain disaster, defiance is the only answer.

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