Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 44

Thread: Religion: a right or a privilege

  1. #1
    Super Moderator eatmywords's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Kingston upon Hull
    Posts
    2,473

    Default Religion: a right or a privilege

    In many ways we have fought for religious freedom, but most of us in this country do not choose to exercise it. However, in the past religion has been forced upon us, but few of us resisted it. So does that make religion a right or a privilege?
    Faced with certain disaster, defiance is the only answer.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Rook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    967

    Default

    I don't think you need to be religious to exercise your religious freedom. As an atheist, I express my religious freedom by dismissing religion. I am free to do that. So in that sense, we all exercise our religious freedom to believe or not to believe.

    Freedom of religion is a right. To say it's a privilege rather implies it's something that can be rescinded, no?

  3. #3
    Super Moderator eatmywords's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Kingston upon Hull
    Posts
    2,473

    Default

    I'm just fascinated by the remarkable difference between our religious culture and Muslim religious culture. They are so extreme, in that we don't seem bothered about religion, even though 80% consider there is a god. However, Muslims see religion as a way of life and way of community. You know if there was a religious purge in this country on Protestantism I really don't think it would compare to the outcry if there was a purge of Islam.

    Have we in this country really reached a stage where we don't care about our national religion, that I think, we wouldn't even notice if it disappeared over night.
    Faced with certain disaster, defiance is the only answer.

  4. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    northwest Engerland
    Posts
    6

    Default

    I agree that its a right. How can it be a "privilege" to commit yourself to communication with and trust in an unseen being who never answers the phone?
    You have the right to explain the Universe in whatever way you see fit, and others have the right to come up with a different explanation. To call it a "privilege" suggests that its fun to believe; and many religious people seem to me to be rather unhappy, although they're often smiling on the outside.

  5. #5
    Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,475

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by eatmywords View Post
    I'm just fascinated by the remarkable difference between our religious culture and Muslim religious culture. They are so extreme, in that we don't seem bothered about religion, even though 80% consider there is a god. However, Muslims see religion as a way of life and way of community. You know if there was a religious purge in this country on Protestantism I really don't think it would compare to the outcry if there was a purge of Islam.

    Have we in this country really reached a stage where we don't care about our national religion, that I think, we wouldn't even notice if it disappeared over night.
    I don't think 80% of the population believe that God exists. I would put the figure at 50% maximum, and that figure decreases sharply as you go to younger people. When I started teaching I was given a project to investigate the effect of religious belief on science learning of students. Out of 100 year 9 (i.e. 13-14y.o.) students, only about 25% said they believed in God, and the vast majority of these were either Muslim or Catholic.

    It is time that we bring the pointless status of the CofE in our country to an end. Rather than backing up the terminally-ill and wishy-washy religion of Anglicanism, the establishment of a state religion instead serves those Muslims who like to point out that religious belief has state protection in this country. I want to live in a society where religious belief has no state protection, and where religion has no privileges. Why do we defend a system that allows Muslims and Jews to hack the genitalia off their defenceless children? I suspect most people think as I do on this issue.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Rook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    967

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by eatmywords View Post
    I'm just fascinated by the remarkable difference between our religious culture and Muslim religious culture.
    I'm more fascinated by the differences within christian cultures. That a protestant ethos can create a superpower such as the USA, and a catholic one can produce a somewhat stunted power like Brazil. Protestant colonies (USA, Australia, NZ, even SA to alesser extent) thrived, and catholic ones (pretty much all of South and Central America) did not. There are of course, exceptions and annomalies (Jamaica, France etc), but I am intrigued by the idea that slight differences in belief of the same fundamental text, can produce such stark differences in societies

  7. #7
    Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,475

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rook View Post
    Protestant colonies (USA, Australia, NZ, even SA to alesser extent) thrived, and catholic ones (pretty much all of South and Central America) did not.
    Not much of a surprise here. Catholic dogma on sex, marriage and contraception is not only designed to exert a malicious power over the subject population, but also to deprive them of the means of economic advancement, by ensuring that families bear more children than is sustainable. Keep em poor and uneducated, keep em coming to church and bowing to the priest, seems to be the motto of the Roman Catholic church. Note how Ireland's economic advancement went hand in hand with the breakdown of the old barriers of respect and deference towards the Catholic church.

    Although they lack the central organisation of the Catholics, much the same could be said for the Muslims too. The key to unlocking the potential of any population lies in the emancipation of women. Any society will flourish once you free women from the slavery of being baby-making machines, and allow them control over their own bodies and the ability to earn their own money.

  8. #8
    Super Moderator eatmywords's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Kingston upon Hull
    Posts
    2,473

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Northumbrian View Post
    Not much of a surprise here. Catholic dogma on sex, marriage and contraception is not only designed to exert a malicious power over the subject population, but also to deprive them of the means of economic advancement, by ensuring that families bear more children than is sustainable. Keep em poor and uneducated, keep em coming to church and bowing to the priest, seems to be the motto of the Roman Catholic church. Note how Ireland's economic advancement went hand in hand with the breakdown of the old barriers of respect and deference towards the Catholic church...
    I can recommend Foucault's History of Sexuality particularly on this aspect of sex as a structure of control and manipulation.
    Faced with certain disaster, defiance is the only answer.

  9. #9
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    10

    Default

    This seems a decent question/assertion with a few good responses so here goes!
    I have a little background in the subject but I have also used this link for this comment: http://humanism.org.uk/campaigns/rel...nd-statistics/
    And like all surveys I take them with a pinch of salt (which is bad for you if you BELIEVE in such things!)

    In England and Wales it seemed that upwards of 60% ticked a religious box on a census but of that number only about 30% stated they were religious. I generally conduct hands-up serveys in my classrooms and this is a believable number. However I would say that after the question and selection of view I ask if anyone would like to change their selection to 'I am not sure yet' and the numbers drop drastically as of course they are young and like the idea of accepting they just don't know yet. The students are predominatly 'Christian' or secular but not exclusivly.
    I would say 'Right' or 'Privilege' is also a state or factor of 'Belief': This 'Right' is indeed a 'Freedom' and this nation has evolved into a nation where 'Freedom' is a given. It can also be a 'Privilege' when looked at as a sense of acheivement and success when the ideals expressed are attained. In religion this is reflected in self belief at the individual level and the 'Community' belief in the reflection of the 'Church' (generic definition intended).
    Where I think a lot goes wrong and calls all sorts of questions into being is when people question other points of view as questions but are, in fact, passing judgement.

  10. #10
    Super Moderator eatmywords's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Kingston upon Hull
    Posts
    2,473

    Default

    You should do a poll of those predominantly Christian students. Ask them how much of choice they had in being Christian, and then do you think freedom in this country as a given?
    Faced with certain disaster, defiance is the only answer.

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •