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Thread: Autocrasy

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    Now a major crippling problem for Britain is our elected leader has little power over our government and can't make any real major decisions for his or her self. The reason is, the house of commons and lords hates and is ultimately scared of any major reform and change within Britain. I will justify this by giving an example. The area of silver town, canning town and the derelict part of Stratford. Silver town was a district where the local populous worked either, a manual job in the docks and if they didn't work there; a manual job in the factories and warehouses nearby associated with the docks , well if they didn't work there, then they were unemployed. What happened you may ask?


    The royal Victoria docks grew inefficient and in decline as the empire came to a close raw materials were no longer imported into Britain from the empire and the new docks at tilbury were more convenient and better, and by the early 90's it closed. Since then it is a derelict area consumed by graffiti, vandalism and very high unemployment because the nearby isle of dogs and the problems that occurred socially, the area has been delayed from regeneration.


    Because of the docks workers did not need specific knowledge, neither any qualifications so the majority are poor and very, very low educated also due to high unemployment and lack of industry and business, boredom within the youth's has resulted to a high amount of vandalism and graffiti. Apart from the fact that the problem has not derived from the docks, Stratford and canning town are in more or less the same situation.


    Now what should be done is new high streets being built, more shops, a retail centre, a new school with a high education record, a museum, a program to give adolescents something to do and a high sense of police and people being taught new trades to make new jobs, moving the current populous in temporary housing up north afterwards sold and given a cleaner better nicer housing which will be theirs and building mass office blocks and bank centres to regenerate the economy of the area and so once an area which brought in masses of money will do so the same and will pay for the regeneration in the long term.


    This would massively improve the economy and the aspiring decline these areas are suffering, but because of the social situation with what happened with the regeneration with the isle of dogs, the whole plan sounds a bit doggy and won't go down well with the current residents and now i am very pro a liberal conservative democratic government, but the problem is if its is too liberal too conservative like problems like this won't ever probably be solved it is not a good thing.


    Well you could say whats the solution? Well possible view as a economic, financial respective. Well with one leader (the prime minister say have all complete power and the parliament be just advisers) economic problems such as these could swiftly be done and with ease and organisation of the economy and problems which a temporary nuisance could extremely help them and the British economy in the long term, but because of this temporary nuisance nothing is solved.


    You could then argue surely it would b4e better if we initiate this kind of government?The problem is its too dangerous and if a radical fascist becomes elected through market researched policy's and highly skilled propaganda. The economy is his squeaky toy and who knows what Britain would suffer from it.


    You could then ask, whats the solution? Well its simple we just shift the balance of power and make it so any radical proposal can be vetoed by parliament but where the elected prime minister can make individual bills under certain categories by himself.


    Please read comment and generally share your point of view.
    Last edited by lucasd_j; 10-23-2012 at 09:38 PM.

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    Read my blog with other points like this @ www.thephilosophyofbritain.blogspot.co.uk
    Last edited by lucasd_j; 10-23-2012 at 09:38 PM.

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    East London is - and always has been - a dumping ground for immigrants. The ex-dockers you talk about went South and East to Kent and Essex, very few stayed in the area - white flight in action. So I think it's a bit disengenuous to talk about the closure of the docks being a major cause of the area's problems.

    I don't know what the solution is, but I am not convinced by 'infrastructure' being it. Investing in retail is fine, but with high streets struggling accross the country, it's not a gaurantee of success - especially when there is Westfield close by.

    Building a "new school with a high education record" is a meaningless platitude without the details of how you ensure a "high education record".

    Transport links in the area are pretty excellent for London. Canning Town is a heartbeat away from the City, a thousand wharehouses and a million shops and offices. All manner of jobs are close by - from CEO to cleaner. Access to jobs, is not the problem

    In the last decade in Peckham (where I come from originally, until about 4 years ago), they begun the process of tearing down the old problem estates and replacing them with terraces (the opposite of what they done in the 60's!). The estates were poorly designed, and acted as ratruns for criminals. Poorly lit with plenty of nooks and cranies, only the worst off lived on them. So tearing them down was proclaimed to be the saviour of the area and an end to crime. It wasn't. Crime is still prevelent, the people now just live in houses rather than flats.

    So if transport, housing and job opportunities are not the problem, you are left with one unsavoury factor; the people - and specifically - the culture of the people. Family break up, lack of positive male role models, no priority given to a good education etc. I don't know how you fix issues like that, but throwing money at it, isn't the answer imho. And neither is reform of the political processes

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    i see your point but the problem has derrived from the closing of the docks which has caused it to be an area of mass unemployment and the low educated by high education school fund the school well so that they can afford expensive and better quality teachers and if yes you do commit to restablishing the area such of silvertown by building pratically a new fresh comunity rather than the mess itsi in now and build trade centres and banks it will help help the economy in the long term and the people their who are generally discontented with the situation now, will be happier as they have a new community more convineint shops and industry and pratically a lot better housing that will be of resonably high value considering the area 200,000 so they can sell it and help them to establish a better life. So yes in this case I think "throwing money at it " will solve the problem.

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    also you say the terrace replacements were bad ideas but i plan that the government builds nice detached housing and police having more influence (increasing local police) will help sort the problem of vandalism also dalinquents in schools might not know the real consequences of vandalism and grafiti and an education program should be started

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    Quote Originally Posted by lucasd_j View Post
    also you say the terrace replacements were bad ideas but i plan that the government builds nice detached housing and police having more influence (increasing local police) will help sort the problem of vandalism also dalinquents in schools might not know the real consequences of vandalism and grafiti and an education program should be started
    No, the terraces were not bad ideas - they are much better than the old North Peckham Estate - but they were not the panacea for crime in the area. An area may have bad housing and hig crime rates, but removing bad housing from that equation does not necessarily mean lower crime. I suspect you would see the same (limited) improvement if you swap the terraces for detached houses - wuite how you would fit detacthed houses in the same footprint as the old NP Estate I do not know.

    "an education program should be started" is meaningless babble unless you back it up with specifics. What will be covered, where wll it take place, who will attend and how will you ensure they do? "Education programs" are good, but they have been done before and have had limited impact on the wider community. So what would be different in your education program?

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    Quote Originally Posted by lucasd_j View Post
    i see your point but the problem has derrived from the closing of the docks which has caused it to be an area of mass unemployment
    The closure of the dock were more of an economic decision than a political one. Times moved on, ships got bigger, container ships came online. Even if the docks were still operational, they would only employ one tenth of the workforce it needed 70 years ago.

    Quote Originally Posted by lucasd_j View Post
    and the low educated by high education school fund the school well so that they can afford expensive and better quality teachers and if yes you do commit to restablishing the area such of silvertown by building pratically a new fresh comunity rather than the mess itsi in now and build trade centres and banks it will help help the economy in the long term and the people their who are generally discontented with the situation now, will be happier as they have a new community more convineint shops and industry and pratically a lot better housing that will be of resonably high value considering the area 200,000 so they can sell it and help them to establish a better life. So yes in this case I think "throwing money at it " will solve the problem.
    I can't quite follow what you are saying here . . I don't really see Silvertown as having good potential for a new community - what with City airport. I think there are better sites for redevolpment tbh

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rook View Post
    I suspect you would see the same (limited) improvement if you swap the terraces for detached houses - wuite how you would fit detacthed houses in the same footprint as the old NP Estate I do not know.
    ?
    You say how could the new houses fit in the same are but in the arear of silvertown and also with silver town there is a large space in both these areas which are derelict and are used for nothing and I intended that the government that would make these houses bigger into better nicer cleaner deatached housing will have plenty of spacy to build on that is used for nothinh

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    Quote Originally Posted by lucasd_j View Post
    You say how could the new houses fit in the same are but in the arear of silvertown and also with silver town there is a large space in both these areas which are derelict and are used for nothing and I intended that the government that would make these houses bigger into better nicer cleaner deatached housing will have plenty of spacy to build on that is used for nothinh
    My general point was that better housing does not solve crime by itself. So replacing the terracing (which are quite nice imho) with detached is not a solution to anything.

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