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Thread: Vicky Pryce guilty

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    Senior Member Rook's Avatar
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    Default Vicky Pryce guilty

    Vicky Pryce guilty over Chris Huhne speeding points

    The former wife of ex-cabinet minister Chris Huhne has been found guilty of perverting the course of justice by taking speeding points on his behalf.

    Vicky Pryce, 60, who had claimed Huhne had forced her to take the points over the incident on the M11 in 2003, was convicted at Southwark Crown Court.

    The judge warned her to be under "no illusions" about her sentence.
    Good. I'm glad that act of petty revenge has well and truly backfired on her


    (Plus, it's good to see that London is was capable of producing an half-educated jury this time round!)

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    Super Moderator eatmywords's Avatar
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    I really thought she was going to evade the hand of justice because Huhne plead guilty. A back-room deal to get the woman, who was pressured into this crime, away scot-free.

    I'm still not really resolved about her role in this affair. She sacrificed so much for this man, and he wasn't even faithful to her. What a despicable politician this man is. However, he was no stranger to controversy and inept politics if you read his wiki bio.
    Faced with certain disaster, defiance is the only answer.

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    I'm glad this woman's plan backfired and she is now facing punishment alongside her ex-husband. These two are a right pair ... perhaps one day they can be reconciled, they deserve each other!

    However, I do question how seriously this crime is being taken. I regard it as a relatively minor crime against the state. There are no victims. If I am honest, I would say it is something I would consider doing for a loved one myself, if I thought I wouldn't get caught. It should have gone to a Magistrates court and and maybe a fine of £200 or £300 imposed, plus the reversal of the original penalty points and fine. Instead, the CPS has spent £100,000 on pursuing this prosecution to the Crown court. We are now told that these two are facing prison sentences. Where is the proportionality in this? We have knife criminals being given community sentences, and rapists getting just a few years. We are told that prisons are overcrowded ... perhaps they should be reserved for those people who have committed violent or sexual crimes against others, and who need to be taken out of society, not those who have committed minor fraud against the state.

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    Punishment should reflect the seriousness of conspiracy and lying to the court. They are not a trivial offences. And, as they both eventually pleaded guilty to being involved with the original speeding, I would hope they will also be hit with substantial driving bans that would come into force after all other penalties have been completed.

    I read somewhere that soon after the original speeding offence, Chris Huhne was clocked using his mobile while driving so lost his licence for a while anyway...
    Last edited by Patman Post; 03-10-2013 at 01:19 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Patman Post View Post
    Punishment should reflect the seriousness of conspiracy and lying to the court.
    They didn't lie to a court, unless you count putting the wrong name on a fixed-penalty notice lying to a court. That was the extent of their conspiracy. As a motorist who is sick of being taxed to the hilt because I drive a car, I am fed up of the state persecution against us. Speed camera's and the ridiculously excessive £60 fines and 3 penalty points are an example of this victimisation of motorists, and frankly if someone sticks two-fingers up at the system, I am not entirely without sympathy for them.

    I'm not saying what they did wasn't wrong, only that prison is a vast over-reaction to a victimless crime of this sort, when violent criminals are often avoiding prison with community sentences and so on. Prison should be reserved for those who commit crimes "against the person", not minor fraud.

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    Senior Member Rook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Northumbrian View Post
    They didn't lie to a court, unless you count putting the wrong name on a fixed-penalty notice lying to a court.
    No, Huhne lied to the court. He stood up and said "I am not guilty". A year and £XXX thousands (as well as half a dozen cynical legal manoeuvres) later, he then stood up and said "err, I am guilty". He wasted plenty of court time and money and for that, he should be jailed to discourage others from trying to waste court time and money as well.
    Similar with Pryce. Instead of admitting her crime, she decided to waste all that time, money and effort.
    If they had held their hands up and admitted it at the first time of asking, I would expect to see a suspended sentence as the original charge was minor. But if you constantly lie to the police, to the court, then expect to do time.

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    Senior Member Mr Muckspreader's Avatar
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    Well these pair really do deserve each other. I reckon the judge should have saved the tax payer some money and really punished these two by sentencing them both to eight months in the same cell. Then the punishment may well have fit the crime.

    Mr Muck

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    The cost of keeping these to in prison is what I would question. they should be paying us in someway. Plus the two places in prison can,t for the time being, be used for someone with a far more serious criminal bent.

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    Senior Member Rook's Avatar
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    Justice is worth the cost, imo

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mack View Post
    The cost of keeping these to in prison is what I would question. they should be paying us in someway. Plus the two places in prison can,t for the time being, be used for someone with a far more serious criminal bent.
    I suggest that is a different debate. Perhaps more-severe penalties that benefit society as well as punish have to be invented. But the judge obviously decided the offences were serious enough for significant punishments. And he delivered from the range available...

    PS — I wonder if they can be pursued for some money to pay for the expense of the trials....
    Last edited by Patman Post; 03-13-2013 at 11:42 AM. Reason: add PS

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