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Thread: Hypocrite Pope

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    Default Hypocrite Pope

    Apparently, Pope Francis has used his first Easter sermon to urge a peaceful resolution to conflicts around the globe such as Korea and Syria.

    http://worldnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2...y-address?lite

    A noble sentiment, but rather hypocritical don't you think when he has openly in the past supported Argentina's illegal claim and aggression against the Falkland Islands? Then again, perhaps like Argentina's fascist foreign minister, he believes the Falklanders don't exist. At least he is 76 years old and only has one lung. Hopefully this old c**t won't be around for too long.
    Last edited by Northumbrian; 03-31-2013 at 03:22 PM.

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    Senior Member Rook's Avatar
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    Argentinians are indoctrinated at school that the Falklands are theirs. So it's no wonder that a man so willing to be indoctrinated by the church, does not have the mental strength to shake off his other indocrinations.

    I have not seen that he supports aggression against the Falklands though . .

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rook View Post
    Argentinians are indoctrinated at school that the Falklands are theirs. So it's no wonder that a man so willing to be indoctrinated by the church, does not have the mental strength to shake off his other indocrinations.

    I have not seen that he supports aggression against the Falklands though . .
    He did make such statements whilst he was Cardinal of Buenos Aires. I don't believe he has made a public statement about the Falklands since becoming Pope, but has met with Argentina's bitch president who apparently urged him to support her aggression. For diplomatic reasons, he is unlikely to make strong statements in support of Argentina whilst Pope, but I'm more concerned about the influence he might yield behind the scenes. A lot of world leaders go to speak with the Pope (I don't know why, but they do).

    As for church indoctrination, I believe that the leaders of the Catholic Church, including this man, come under the category of "indoctrinators" rather than "indoctrinated". I'm sure that Francis is an intelligent man and, like many of his ilk, I have some doubts about whether they themselves truly believe the nonsense and fairy-tales they peddle to others. What is not in doubt, however, is how much they enjoy the power they have over the lives of weaker people as a result of the indoctrination process.

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    Junior Member mostyn's Avatar
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    plenty of indoctrination of the secularists in Britain who, presumably, " enjoy the power they have over the lives of weaker people" that this gives them.
    one glance at the offerings of the british media and television would I think prove to any objective observer that the indoctrination process of the secularists has indeed now reached extraordinary lengths.
    What Orwell called the total process of thought control.
    Last edited by mostyn; 05-06-2013 at 09:24 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mostyn View Post
    plenty of indoctrination of the secularists in Britain who, presumably, " enjoy the power they have over the lives of weaker people" that this gives them.
    one glance at the offerings of the british media and television would I think prove to any objective observer that the indoctrination process of the secularists has indeed now reached extraordinary lengths.
    What Orwell called the total process of thought control.
    We live in a country where the state religion has a block of reserved seats in our parliament. Where criticising peoples religous beliefs (especially if they are Muslim) can land you in hot water. Where Christains demand the right to write our laws on such things as Gay Marriage, Abortion and teaching Creationism. And you think that us secularists are indoctrinating people? I'm sorry but you need a serious reality check.

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    I'm not totally convinced about the truth of the original statement: does (or has) the Pope supported aggression against the Falklands? He may support Argentina's claim that the islands are their territory, but that's not to say he supports aggression or military action.

    On a couple of subsidiary points:

    a) I must agree about the strangeness of the UK having a state religion. Why should there be Lords Spiritual in the legislature as of right — surely that's only one step down from countries like Iran?

    b) I don't think religion is necessarily a bad thing — it brings a lot of people a lot of comfort. But what I personally find disturbing is aggressive fundamentalism in support of any belief, whether it be political, religious, secularist, vegitarianism, etc...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Patman Post View Post
    I'm not totally convinced about the truth of the original statement: does (or has) the Pope supported aggression against the Falklands? He may support Argentina's claim that the islands are their territory, but that's not to say he supports aggression or military action.
    Well here is quote made only a year ago whilst he was still Cardinal in Buenos Aires:

    "We come to pray for all who have fallen, sons of the homeland who went out to defend their mother, the homeland, and to reclaim what is theirs, that is of the homeland, and it was usurped."
    Seems pretty much like supporting military aggression to me, and lets not forget he had very close ties with the former fascist regime in Argentina. Even supporting an illegal territorial claim is aggression in my book. The Falkland Islanders need to live with the freedom and security of knowing that their large and powerful neighbour does not covet and claim the land which is rightfully theirs. How would the Faroe Islanders feel if we made a random claim against their territory?

    Quote Originally Posted by Patman Post View Post
    On a couple of subsidiary points:

    a) I must agree about the strangeness of the UK having a state religion. Why should there be Lords Spiritual in the legislature as of right — surely that's only one step down from countries like Iran?
    Indeed, although one might add that having a secular constitution and a lack of a state religion does not necessarily protect you from the evils of religion. Just look at the US and the rise of evangelical fundamentalism in the mid-West. Children attending state schools in Louisiana will now be taught creationism instead of evolution in science classes. One has to remain vigilant against religion at all times.

    Quote Originally Posted by Patman Post View Post
    b) I don't think religion is necessarily a bad thing — it brings a lot of people a lot of comfort. But what I personally find disturbing is aggressive fundamentalism in support of any belief, whether it be political, religious, secularist, vegitarianism, etc...
    Its always a nice idea that whatever its wrongs, religion brings comfort to people in their own homes. Perhaps it does, but the problem is that religion never stays in peoples homes. Religious people, sooner or later, will always makes demands on the rest of society, including those who don't share their beliefs.

    There is no such thing as fundamentalist secularism by the way ... secularism is the opposite to fundamentalism.

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    I suggest you look at a report in Spanish of what was said — online there's El País, 02 de Abril de 2012
    http://elsolonline.com/noticias/view...po-en-malvinas

    Nowhere is there support for aggression. Certainly there is compassion for the fallen and a call for support for the dependents of the dead and injured. And even a recognition that the Argentinian forces believed they went to reclaim a country that was "theirs" (theirs not "ours" you'll note — possibly a concession to those in Argentina who don't support armed conflict).

    As an Argentinian, Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio may support his country's claim. But that is a long way from supporting aggression and being a hypocrite...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Northumbrian View Post
    Religious people, sooner or later, will always makes demands on the rest of society, including those who don't share their beliefs.

    There is no such thing as fundamentalist secularism by the way ... secularism is the opposite to fundamentalism.
    In my experience, rampant/rabid/rabble-rousing secularists are not live-and-let-lives. They are as likely as anyone else to want to impose their beliefs on society. And by demanding everyone adheres to an unwavering basic belief/conviction that religious observance has no place in a modern world, they are the equal of any religious fundamentalist.

    In my view, the majority of people neither believe nor disbelieve. They attend religious weddings namings and funerals as a social act without placing any deep religious significance in them...

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    Senior Member Rook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patman Post View Post
    In my experience, rampant/rabid/rabble-rousing secularists are not live-and-let-lives. They are as likely as anyone else to want to impose their beliefs on society. And by demanding everyone adheres to an unwavering basic belief/conviction that religious observance has no place in a modern world, they are the equal of any religious fundamentalist.
    You may be confusing secularists with atheists? The only belief secularists share is that government should be free of religion - not (necessarily) that people themselves should not be religious. Many secularists are religious in their private lives of course, they just don't want government involved.

    Atheists share a lack of belief, which can manifest itself very robustly of course, but very few actually demand everyone else adheres to their views. I think the similarities between them and the religious fundamentalists is rather overplayed a lot of the time - both in seriousness (death threats etc) and scale (atheism makes no claim on any other area of your life)

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