Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 23 of 23

Thread: Why we need to teach science in school

  1. #21
    Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,475

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wolfie View Post
    Wakefield is not a dangerous nutter...He stuck by his beliefs..got struck off for them.
    In that sentence Wolfie, you are actually highlighting the problem with public understanding of science. Science is not politics or history or religion. There is no place for "beliefs" or "personal judgements" or "emotion" about anything in science. Wakefield wrote his now discredited case-study based on the "beliefs" of the 12 sets of parents who "believed" that the MMR jab caused their childs autism. These parents were in no clinical position to make such a judgement and naturally were looking for someone or something to blame for their childs illness.

    Case studies can be interesting and informative, but they are the weakest method of scientific research. The reason why Wakefield deserved to be struck off is that, first of all, he made hard conclusions based on a case study. Secondly, he publicised his non-scientific conclusions extensively in the media, causing a public panic which ultimately has cost lives. Science has to be based on hard evidence, rigourously verified through a procedure of statistical analysis and peer review. Perhaps you think that is rather cold, but it is the reason why science actually works and has improved all our lives.

    There is no evidence whatsoever that the MMR jab causes Autism. Not one iota. On the other hand, there is plenty of evidence that Measles can kill people. Simples.
    Last edited by Northumbrian; 05-05-2013 at 06:07 PM.

  2. #22

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Northumbrian View Post
    In that sentence Wolfie, you are actually highlighting the problem with public understanding of science. Science is not politics or history or religion. There is no place for "beliefs" or "personal judgements" or "emotion" about anything in science. Wakefield wrote his now discredited case-study based on the "beliefs" of the 12 sets of parents who "believed" that the MMR jab caused their childs autism. These parents were in no clinical position to make such a judgement and naturally were looking for someone or something to blame for their childs illness.

    Case studies can be interesting and informative, but they are the weakest method of scientific research. The reason why Wakefield deserved to be struck off is that, first of all, he made hard conclusions based on a case study. Secondly, he publicised his non-scientific conclusions extensively in the media, causing a public panic which ultimately has cost lives. Science has to be based on hard evidence, rigourously verified through a procedure of statistical analysis and peer review. Perhaps you think that is rather cold, but it is the reason why science actually works and has improved all our lives.

    There is no evidence whatsoever that the MMR jab causes Autism. Not one iota. On the other hand, there is plenty of evidence that Measles can kill people. Simples.
    We will see..thousands of children being innoculated..William McBride told the authorities that Thalidomide was dangerous..he received virtually the same treatment...

    PS...measles is a virulent form of Herpes!!

  3. #23
    Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,475

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wolfie View Post
    We will see..thousands of children being innoculated..William McBride told the authorities that Thalidomide was dangerous..he received virtually the same treatment...
    Actually the number of people worldwide who have been innoculated with MMR going back over 30 years is around 500 million! And yet there is still not a single case of Autism which has a proven link with MMR. In Japan, a country which switched from using MMR to using single vaccines, the rate of Autism actually increased slightly! So I am afraid we already have "seen".

    Thalidomide is a totally different matter. The disasterous side-effects were obvious within a few years of its availability, with over 10,000 birth defects worldwide. Going back 50 years ago, you are also talking about a time of medical ignorance, when medical scientists did not even suspect that drugs or other toxins could pass from the mother's bloodstream into her unborn child. Hence little or no restrictions were placed on the use of any medicines during pregnancy.

    The funny thing is that even if by some utter fluke, it came to light that some cases of Autism were linked to MMR, it would not vindicate Wakefield in the slightest. That is not how science works. Science makes conclusions based on the best evidence that it has available to it at the time. The best you would be able to say about Wakefield is that he made a lucky guess. However, there is no place in science for guesswork, only properly conducted research which reaches statistically significant conclusions. These conclusions must be held up by peer-review to scrutiny regarding their reliability and validity. For one man to go it alone and start briefing the media about his unproven hypothesis demonstrates a combination of both arrogance and scientific incompetence.

    Quote Originally Posted by wolfie View Post
    PS...measles is a virulent form of Herpes!!
    Well that doesn't make it any less dangerous, especially to pregnant women or people with already compromised immune systems. Ask the family of the man who died in South Wales.
    Last edited by Northumbrian; 05-12-2013 at 11:04 PM.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •